thrivemusictherapy:

mymusicmasterclass:

New studies have been emerging highlighting the benefits of music for many diseases, etc.  Who knows, maybe “healing music” will become a major market in the next 10 years.  Could music therapy become a growth industry?  Very interesting and exciting stuff…

Article at http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/274336.php

Hear, hear!

Awesome!! This definitely my dream, to do research like Dr. Limb! Also as a huge fan of TED talks, this is his talk “Your Brain on Improv”: http://www.ted.com/talks/charles_limb_your_brain_on_improv

Countdown to Summer 2014! RIC externship and Camp Neuro!

As I’m struggling to study for my final this Friday, I can’t help but be super excited for my summer! My med school gives us 10 weeks between 1st and 2nd year of med school, and so far my summer is jam packed with awesome plans!

First, I’m helping plan for a Camp Neuro, a 1 week academic camp for high school students. I will probably teach a class or workshop on The Musical Brain and/or Neurorehabilitation!

Also, I’m participating in an 8 week program at Northwestern/Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago that combines clinical work and research! SO EXCITED!! Especially since the Rehabilitation Institute Chicago has been the #1 Rehabilitation Hospital for the last 20+ years! I’m hoping I’ll get to rotate in pediatric rehabilitation and neurorehabilitation.

Finally, I was selected to do a weekend course in Neurosurgery 101 at Saint Louis University. 

So, a neuro-filled summer! Of course, I’m taking a week for vacation, and going to two weddings, so I have some “fun” things planned. But to me, everything neuro is fun.

But I’m actually looking forward to my final this Friday, because that means I start my last block of my 1st year of medical school…you guessed it: Neuro!

—Humans of New York, 04/07/2014

thrivemusictherapy:

Tiny Preemies Get A Boost From Live Music Therapy


CHICAGO (AP) — As the guitarist strums and softly sings a lullaby in Spanish, tiny Augustin Morales stops squirming in his hospital crib and closes his eyes.

This is therapy in a newborn intensive care unit, and research suggests that music may help those born way too soon adapt to life outside the womb.

Some tiny preemies are too small and fragile to be held and comforted by human touch, and many are often fussy and show other signs of stress. Other common complications include immature lungs, eye disease, problems with sucking, and sleeping and alertness difficulties.

Recent studies and anecdotal reports suggest the vibrations and soothing rhythms of music, especially performed live in the hospital, might benefit preemies and other sick babies.

Many insurers won’t pay for music therapy because of doubts that it results in any lasting medical improvement. Some doctors say the music works best at relieving babies’ stress and helping parents bond with infants too sick to go home.

But amid beeping monitors, IV poles and plastic breathing tubes in infants’ rooms at Chicago’s Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital, music therapist Elizabeth Klinger provides a soothing contrast that even the tiniest babies seem to notice.

"What music therapy can uniquely provide is that passive listening experience that just encourages relaxation for the patient, encourages participation by the family," Klinger said after a recent session in Augustin’s hospital room.

Read more at: http://news.yahoo.com/tiny-preemies-boost-live-music-therapy-071211993.html

thrivemusictherapy:

This is wonderful.

Click through photo for an interactive map of the brain where you can learn how the brain processes music and why music therapy works to optimize the brain and provide more efficient therapy.
via NeuroRhythm Music Therapy Services

thrivemusictherapy:

This is wonderful.

Click through photo for an interactive map of the brain where you can learn how the brain processes music and why music therapy works to optimize the brain and provide more efficient therapy.

via NeuroRhythm Music Therapy Services


Technique, and skills you’ve been given, don’t make you an artist. All the skills you’ve gained, that doesn’t show people who you are. That’s just a building block and a fundamental tool to where you can start being you. 

neuroimagining:

adriennes:

Putting this here for myself, since four-hand piano is about to make a comeback in my life.

I need a partner and a little more dedication to my practice schedule but maybe listening to some of these will motivate me…

Oh I wish we could do a four hands piece! Just found a four hands of Rachmaninoff piano concerto no. 2…aka one of my favorite music pieces ever.